How to Frost a Cake with Buttercream

Today’s tutorial is all about how to frost a smooth cake. Getting that nice, smooth finish when icing a cake can take some practice, but I have been asked so many times about how I get my icing so smooth, I’ve finally put together some instructions that I hope will be helpful. Just remember you have to be patient. My first cake did not look like my current cakes. It took practice – and the right tools.

Want to frost cupcakes? See my post on how to beautifully frost your cupcakes!


Read transcript
Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

So to start, let’s talk about the tools you’ll need:

Icing tips (Wilton #789 for icing the sides and Ateco 844 for piping the border)
Icing bags
Turntable (I use Wilton Trim-N-Turn Ultra Cake Decorating Turntable)
Icing smoother (I 100% recommend Ateco Decorating Comb over any other)
9 inch offset spatula (I use Wilton Angled Spatula)
Fondant smoother (I use Wilton Easy Glide Fondant Smoother)
Viva paper towels (Viva brand specifically)

Let’s talk about that icing smoother for a second. I linked to it above, but it’s an Ateco smoother that costs less than $5. It is the best money I have ever spent on a tool. I used to use another one, but it was big and clunky and I had no idea how much it hindered my ability to get a nice, smooth cake until I tried this one. It’s lightweight, small and easy to use.

In addition to those tools, you’ll obviously need a cake and some icing. I used regular American Buttercream (American Buttercream recipe here). For my cakes that are about this size, I go through about 2 1/2 recipes worth.

For this tutorial, I started with a cake that was already crumb coated and had a layer of icing on the top of the cake. It’s important to already have the top layer on the cake and get it as smooth as you can with your offset spatula. It’ll get further smoothed later, but it’s best to have it smooth now too.

The crumb coat isn’t entirely necessary for every cake. Typically chocolate cakes are more likely to need them, since they tend to have more crumbs. But because of the way I add my icing, it’s not always necessary. I use an icing tip and bag, which reduces crumbs mixing into the icing.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

How to Frost a Cake

So to get started from here, you’ll want your icing bag fitted with the Wilton #789 icing tip and filled with icing. Starting from the bottom of the cake, pipe icing around the edge, trying to keep even pressure on the bag so that the layer of icing is even.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

You’ll have multiple layers of piped icing, depending on the height of your cake. The top layer needs to stick above the top edge of the cake. This will be important later for smoothing the top edges/corners of the cake.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

When you are done applying the icing to the sides of the cake, it’s time to smooth it. This is where the icing smoother comes in. Place it against the side of the cake. You want to hold it straight up and down, as straight as possible. Hold your icing smoother in the same place and use your other hand to turn the turntable. Continue to turn the turntable, scraping the icing off of the smoother occasionally so that there isn’t too much buildup. I clean off my smoother regularly and when I scrape the excess icing off of it, I usually also wipe it with a paper towel, so that there isn’t anything left on there that will mess up the icing once I place it back on the side of the cake.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Here is an image showing the angle at which I hold the smoother. I really believe the angle makes a big difference in the way the icing smooths. Do not hold it at 90 degrees. The tighter the angle (like shown), the better the excess icing pulls around the cake and fills in gaps.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

After doing a few turns of the turntable, you’ll notice some gaps that are deeper and should probably be filled in. I usually notice it at the “seems” where the three layers of icing were piped on. At this point, use your offset spatula to add some icing to the gaps. You’ll want to have a little excess icing, rather than too little.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Begin smoothing the sides again, pulling the excess icing around the cake to fill in gaps, then wiping off the icing smoother as needed.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Continue working around the outside of the cake, pulling the icing, then scraping it off of the icing smoother. You can fill in more gaps if needed, just keep working the sides until you are happy with it.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

You should end up with a cake that looks like this. The sides are mostly smooth and the excess icing from the top is still sticking up above the cake. In some places you may have tiny little holes from the air in the icing. The angle that you hold the icing smoother can make a difference in how many of those you end up with. Again, tighter angle is better. Also, some of those will fill in as we smooth the sides again later with a paper towel.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Next is always the scariest part! The top edges/corners. It was even harder to do these while taking photos. 🙂 The whole icing process took longer than normal, so my icing started to crust a bit and so it’s a little drier in the photos than yours should be at this point. You want to work as quickly as you can. If the icing starts to crust, it’s harder to work with.

To do the edges, you can use the icing smoother or the offset spatula. I use either, depending on my mood, though often I do feel like the offset spatula gives me more control. Pull the icing in towards the middle of the cake, making the corner level with the top of the cake. The spatula should be at about a 45 degree angle. The excess icing should help fill in any uneven-ness on those top corners as you pull it in.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!
Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Go all the way around the cake, until it looks like the one below. Again, my icing is a bit drier than yours should be. Hopefully, your cake top is a bit smoother.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Use your offset spatula to continue to work the icing on the top of the cake and smooth the top edges. Do not mess with the sides or side part of the corners yet. Just try to get the top as smooth as you can, the sides should already be smooth.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Next, we use the paper towel to finish smoothing any imperfections that are left from the offset spatula. Like I said above, I ONLY use Viva paper towels for this. They are the only paper towel I know of that doesn’t have raised patterns on it. You’ll notice that one side is smoother than the other – that’s the side you want against the cake.

I usually start with the top of the cake, since it tends to be rougher and need more work. Along with your paper towel, you’ll need the fondant smoother. Place the paper towel on the cake, smoothest side down, and rub in small circular motions with the fondant smoother to smooth out the icing. Press firmly and evenly, but not hard.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Do the same with the sides of the cake, evening out any bumps or air holes.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

To help make sharper corners, place the paper towel on the top of cake, letting it hang over the edge and down the side. Placing your fingers against the side of the cake to keep the icing in place, use the fondant smoother to gently push the icing out towards to edge to help make that corner sharp. Do that anywhere you think the edges could use it.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Keep working that paper towel and fondant smoother until you are happy with your cake.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Next, I like to take my offset spatula and remove excess icing at the bottom of the cake and give it a clean edge. The spatula is placed at an angle so that nothing is actually touching the side of the cake, but just the bottom of the spatula side is grabbing the excess icing. Then pull the excess towards you and away from the cake.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Use your other icing tip to pipe on your border. I used Ateco tip 844, but you could also use Wilton 1M, which is similar, or any other tip you prefer.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

Sprinkle with some spraaaankles (I used Wilton Spring Confetti Sprinkles!

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

And you’re done! Put your cake on your favorite cake stand, add a few more sprinkles and dig in!! It’s time to eat all that hard work. 😉

*Update* For some help with getting the right frosting consistency, check out my new post, How to Get the Right Frosting Consistency, on how I like to do it.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!

This page includes affiliate links.

Tutorial - How to frost a perfectly smooth cake with buttercream icing! Images and animated gifs with detailed instructions!
Learn how to decorate Sugar Cookies with Royal Icing

Practice your smoothing technique on some of these delicious cakes:

Moist and Fluffy Vanilla Cake
(the recipe for the cake in the tutorial above!)
Moist and Fluffy Vanilla Cake! Such a soft, tender cake!

Strawberry Layer Cake
Strawberry Layer Cake full of fresh strawberries for flavor! Covered in sprinkles for a cute baby shower cake!

Best Chocolate Cake
Best Chocolate Cake - incredibly moist and chocolatey!

Bananas Foster Layer Cake
Bananas Foster Layer Cake - this cake is full of cinnamon, bananas and rum sauce! So good!

Cherry Chocolate Chip Cake
Cherry Chocolate Chip Cake - full of maraschino cherry flavor and mini chocolate chips!

Chocolate Oreo Cake
Chocolate Oreo Cake

Sparkling Cranberry White Chocolate Cake
Sparkling Cranberry White Chocolate Cake - super moist vanilla cake full of fresh cranberries, iced with white chocolate icing and topped with sparking cranberries!

This post may contain affiliate sales links. Please read my disclosure policy.

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Have a question? Use the form below to submit your question or comment. I love hearing from you and seeing what you made!

245 Comments
  1. Catherine

    Hi lindsay thank u for sharing ur decorating method.
    By the way, doesnt the paper towel stick to the frosting at all? Or tear as u lift it up from the frosting?
    I am in Australia and i dont know if theres viva paper towel here so im just thinking to get the strongest paper towel with a smooth side.

    1. Lindsay

      You want to make sure to have the right consistency frosting so that the paper towel doesn’t stick. Since I’ve received several questions about that, I’m currently working on an addition to this tutorial to talk about that.

  2. Sidney

    Hi Lindsay,

    I have followed your tutorials and have tried this method on two cakes with your buttercream recipe as well. It worked very well on the first, but on the second, I struggled with still being able to kind of “see” the cake layers through the icing. I wasn’t seeing the actual layers, but more of the shape of each layer and the filling between them, which really distracted from the smoothness of the cake. I’m thinking that I might be piping too little icing on the sides, and that us what is causing it. Do you have any suggestions?

    Also, I have been leveling my cake layers to the point that they look great with a crumb coat, but when I add the rest of the icing, they end up leaning a bit, or tilted. Any recommendations to keep my cakes straighter?

    Thank you for all your yummy recipes! Your blog is one of my favorites!

    1. Lindsay

      Hi Sidney! Do you know if it’s the frosting kind of squeezing out from between the cake layers that you’re seeing? It’s possible that it’s not the thickness of the layer of frosting on the outside of the cake, but the consistency (thickness) of the frosting itself. I’ve had a couple questions lately related to the consistency of the frosting, so I’m thinking that might be my next tutorial. 🙂 In your case though, it sounds like the frosting might be a bit thin for the cake layers. I tend to use a thicker frosting than some people so that it doesn’t smoosh out when the cake is stacked. Does that sound like what’s happening? The leaning cake issue could also be from the same issue of the frosting moving around after you stack the cake because it’s thin.

      1. Sidney

        I’m not sure. I followed your advice on checking consistency by how much sticks to your finger. I made your raspberry almond layer cake, and the raspberry buttercream was thinner than the normal buttercream and the almond that covered the cake. So that might have been part of the problem. But I do think I might still be piping it on too thin around the outside.

        A tutorial on consistency would be great! Thanks!

      2. Sidney

        Sorry to respond twice! I did notice that the cake felt very sturdy and straight, the layers weren’t sliding at all, until I put the icing on top of the cake and started doing the sides, then it started oozing a bit. I wonder if I put too much on top of the cake?

  3. Erin

    HI Lindsay, I love your tutorial about using the paper towel and I even have started using your buttercream recipe! I like the texture of it with half of it being shortening. However, I tried the paper towel method with it, and it keeps sticking. The icing is not crusting. I put the cake in the fridge for a few minutes hoping this would help and it crusted, but still stuck to the paper towel after a couple minutes of working with it. Do you have any advice? Thank you!

    1. Lindsay

      It sounds like the frosting is a little thin, so it’s sticking. To test the consistency of frosting for the paper towel method, I tap it with my finger when it’s in the mixing bowl. I want it to stick to my finger a little bit, but not too much. If it sticks really easily, it’ll likely stick to a cupcake. If it doesn’t stick to my finger at all, it’ll be too thick for spreading. I hope that helps!

  4. Shannan

    I can’t thank you enough for such a detailed tutorial! Any chance you could do one in getting a smooth buttercream top on a sugar cookie? I can’t seem to ever get mine smooth without using royal icing.

    1. Lindsay

      Hmm, I’ve never tried or seen cookies with smooth buttercream I don’t think. I’ll have to do a little looking around. 🙂 I’m glad you enjoyed the tutorial!

  5. fb

    I want to make this cake, but if i crumb coat it the night before, wouldn’t the remaining frosting dry out? How could you tackle this problem?
    I love your cakes by the way, they look so proffesional!

    1. Lindsay

      The frosting on the cake will definitely crust. It might be ok if it’s refrigerated. Also, if you’re using the same method of adding the frosting with the piping tips, it might be ok. Just re mix the frosting a bit to soften things up again.

  6. Dani Gonzales

    Just wanted to say THANK YOU Lindsay!! I decided to make my 3 year olds birthday cake for the first time as I realllly didn’t want to pay $$$ for it. I followed the tutorial step by step and it turned out fantastic (including your recipe for strawberry and vanilla frosting)! This was my first attempt at a buttercream cake as well, so I could not have accomplished it without your guidance! Happy New Year to you!

  7. Chava

    Can you please explain what the crumb coating is that you started off with at the beginning of the directions? I’ve heard of this before but when I try to google it all I get is cakes covered with crumbs. Like, on purpose – “Crush oreo cookies and sprinkle over the top to coat it with crumbs.” Ummmm don’t think so!

    1. Lindsay

      It’s really just an initial thin layer of frosting. It’s called a “crumb” coat because it typically is used to keep all the crumbs in place so that when you add a final layer of frosting, you don’t have crumbs showing.

  8. Susan

    This is the best tutorial I’ve seen! Thank you for giving out so many tips!
    I’ve attempted a “smooth cake” but using fondant – but that’s sorta cheating 😉
    I’m so glad I found YOU ! <3

  9. Marnee

    Thank you very much for the tutorial. I have just ordered all the accessories. I would like to make the vanilla buttercream frosting in pink as you have done. What do you add to the original recipe to make it pink? Have I missed something? I looked on your blog at other frostings and they added chopped strawberries or raspberries. Is that what you have done here? I live in Spain and cannot get the Viva paper or any other make without patterns. Any other suggestions about what I could use instead?

    1. Lindsay

      I’m glad you found it helpful! You can use icing gel color to color the frosting. As for another kind of paper towel, I’m not sure of another option. You should still be able to get it pretty smooth though without it.

  10. Rabia

    I live in india . I am not sure if I could get this paper towel brand ( Viva).
    Does this technique work for whipped cream also?
    One question. Should we freeze the cake before we smoothen out with paper towel and smoothener. will the cream not stick if we dont refrigerate?

    1. Lindsay

      Everything but the paper towel would work with whipped cream. I don’t freeze the cake first. It’s really more about the consistency of the frosting. If it’s too thin and sticky, it’ll stick to the paper towel.

  11. Elikwu winifred

    Wao ! Tnx for sharing have just gotten another knowledge about the application of egg using only white & using viva paper to get a very smooth work. Nice tutorial.

  12. carmenesteladuqueramirez

    muy agradecida por compartir estas deliciosas recetas.pronto empezare a practicarlas para iniciar mi negocio propio.  me encanta todo sobre  reposteria .y se que con sus aportes lo podre lograr. miles de bendiciones.

  13. Melanie

    This is such a beautiful cake! I just ordered all of your recommended products so I can hopefully attempt to make this! I will be doing a two-tier cake (9” and 6”) and will need to tweak the instructions to accomodate the second tier. My instinct tells me I should frost them both separately, then very, very carefully place the 6” tier on top, secure with a dowel, then re-smooth the top. What do you think?

  14. Paula

    Have you tried this with a cream cheese frosting? Half cream cheese/half butter? Would like to use this technique for my daughters cake this weekend.
    Thanks.

    1. Lindsay

      Yes, I have. Depending on how thick your cream cheese frosting is, the paper towel may stick. The rest of the method will work fine.

  15. Virginie

    Thank you so much for your explication <3
    I'm very curious to try the recipe (because I just bought new nozzles 😉

    Though I have a little question, because my original language is Dutch, and I don't understand what "shortening" means.
    I tried to search on www, but I do'nt seem to find it here.
    Can you please give me some brands, that I can ask in our stores if they know something similar?
    Thank you very much in advance! x

      1. Virginie

        Thank you very much for your help, Lindsay! It doesn’t seem familiair to me, but I will ask in a bakery store and show the ingredients, maybe they know what it it 😉

      2. Marllen

        I realise this thread is a few months old, only just found your blog. I’ve been baking cakes for 25 years and have only used an offset spatula, will now give your paper towel and buttercream recipe a go. 

        In response to Virginie: the Crisco brand is sold by some Jumbo stores. Shortening is bakvet, een plantaardige olie. I am Dutch myself and find living in Australia, I have to adapt Dutch recipes to the ingredients I can source here. Good luck with your baking.

  16. Jeanne

    Really appreciate your tutorial…your pictorial how-to’s are great and the finished cakes are so smooth and lovely. Something to aspire to……so, a big thank you, all the way from Kenya

  17. TerriSue

    Oh Lindsey, If I had only found you in February!  My son and then fiance wanted me to make their wedding cake.  Since this was a very informal affair I agreed.  It was just immediate family.  They are planning a big ceremony when they can save the money for it.  I am 58.  My mother decorated cakes having taken Wilton classes in the 50’s.  What little I know came from watching her.  Styles of cakes have changed so much.  My mother never tried to get the finish you have just explained here.  I looked all over the web trying to figure out how to do this.  I was working with an Italian Buttercream.  The best help I came up with was using a hot offset spatula to smooth the icing.  Long story shorter, the cake was wonderful, I piped lilies that looked like lilies. (the bride loves lilies and doesn’t like roses), my first attempt at making a meringue buttercream sold me on them forever.  The icing was smoother than I can usually get it by just putting it on with an offset spatula, but it wasn’t anything like your beautiful cakes always look.  I want to try your method now.  I came to this page via your Lemon Raspberry Layer Cake.  I am going to make it just to try this method, not to mention I am a citrus lover, and my granddaughter goes crazy over anything with a berry in it.  I guess my only problem is going to be buying the paper towels.  We don’t buy disposable paper products except for TP.  So do I want that completely smooth cake or am I going to chop down a tree? lol

  18. Niki

    I tried this method the other week.  The icing stuck to the paper towel.  I did not use your recipe, but my own buttercream recipe that does crust.  Is there a magic time I should wait before putting the paper towel to avoid it from sticking to the paper towel?

    1. Lindsay

      Without knowing much about your buttercream, I’m going to guess it has to do with how much liquid you use in the frosting. I make mine quite thick so that it doesn’t stick. When I tap my finger up against the frosting in the bowl (when I’m mixing it), just a little bit will stick to my finger rather than a bunch sticking.

  19. Katy

    This may be a silly question, but I’m not the biggest fan of fondant but I want the same look. So I was thinking instead of doing fondant over the entire cake I would try doing your smooth buttercream frosting tutorial, but then I got to thinking, would you still be able to stick fondant decorations onto the sides of the cake without the icing peeling away? For some reason I just get this horrible vision of doing all this work just to see it fall apart haha. Thanks again for your great tutorial!

    1. Lindsay

      Yes, you can still add fondant decorations. I use a sugar water made by dissolving some fondant in a little bit of water. Then I use a brush to add the sugar water to the fondant decoration (making it sticky) and press it lightly onto the cake. As long as they aren’t really big or heavy decorations, they should be fine.

  20. Chris

    Thank you a million times for this tutorial. It is by far the best one I’ve found on the interwebs. : )
    I’ve already tried it once and my cake looked 150% better already. Love your site!

  21. Carla Walton

    I’ve used the Viva alone and it workedpretty well but it is so great to see your steps prior to the Viva. One little question though. What size piping bag are you using? I just fussed at myself for buying so much baking stuff but here I go again! Thanks for the great directions!

  22. DeeDee Bryans

    I have a question that may seem silly. How do you keep your cake from sliding around on a cake turntable and how do you you transfer the cake to a pretty cake stand after it has been frosted?   Thanks!     Btw, love your tutorial! DeeDee

    1. Lindsay

      My cake stand actually has a non-slide surface, but if yours is sliding around a great trick is to use the stuff that helps rugs not slip around on a hardwood floor. I use them all the time when transporting cakes and desserts to keep them from sliding around the car. Just cut it into small pieces. A small piece will work wonders. As for transferring the frosted cake to a stand, I frost cakes on cardboard cake circles. If you look in these photos of the cake on the stand, you can see it underneath the sprinkles. I trim it down so that it fits within the stand. I hope that helps! Thanks!

  23. Kate

    These cakes look so exquisite and the frosting is like art. I love making cakes and I consider my mixes to be super delicious. When it comes to frosting though, that is an art I have yet to perfect!

  24. Shellie

    That’s so much for an amazing tutorial I’m so excited to try! I’m new to trying my own decorated cakes so is it best to freeze for a short time before icing it? Thanks so much!

    1. Lindsay

      I read a lot of tutorials that talk about refrigerating cakes first. Unless my cake has a filling that is supposed to be refrigerated and I want it to firm up before frosting (like a lemon curd), I don’t refrigerate or freeze it first. If you try it though and find that refrigerating helps, you certainly can.

  25. Nancy L

    This is the MOST beautiful cake ever!!  I love your tutorial.  I want to try to make a cake as smooth as yours!  I’ve dabbled in cake decorating in the past and I really love doing it, but I haven’t made a cake in years!     I think I might dig out my pastry bags and give this cake a whirl!  All of your cakes are gorgeous and look so wonderfully delicious!  I don’t remember how I got to your blog, but I am so glad I did!    🙂

    1. Julie

      Beautiful cake! How do you keep the seam between the layers from showing? I tend to have a line that i can never seem to hide. Also is the paper towel dry or damp? Thanks for your help!

      1. Lindsay

        The line you mention I’m guessing is from the filling between your cake layers. That usually is a frosting or filling consistency issue. You want any frosting between your layers to be thick enough that it isn’t going to squish out and create those lines or bulging. Check out my tutorial for filling and stacking cakes, if you’d like. And the paper towel is dry.

  26. Anjuli

    This is a beautiful cake and I appreciate your step by step tutorial with photos. I do have one question and it’s how do you avoid frosting sticking to the paper towel? Did the cake go into the the refrigerator for a bit?

    1. Lindsay

      No, I don’t refrigerate the cake. The buttercream is a crusting buttercream, so you actually need to use the paper towel right away. I linked to the buttercream recipe I use in the post above. Not all frostings will work with the paper towel.

  27. Chandra@The Plaid & Paisley Kitchen

    I have alwaysed loved your frosting on your cakes! I am so glad you created this tutorial. I have used wax paper similarly to the paper towel. But there is a chance of wrinkles with the wax. I am going to try this method soon!

    1. lifeloveandsugar@gmail.com

      Thanks Chandra! Yes, I’d think wax paper could give wrinkles. The paper towels are great!

  28. lidia

    really nice and helpful , but can i use something else ,like baking paper ,as i do not live in america and i can’t use the Viva paper towels , as not found where i live and i looked around and can’t find any smooth paper towels ,all the brands have paten , only the blue paper towel used on the kitchens restaurants or cafe do not have ant paten buy they blue and i am afraid not good enough or maybe the colour will transfer . Thank you and good luck with all you do.

    1. lifeloveandsugar@gmail.com

      You could try baking paper, but just be careful to not wrinkle it or that will transfer to the cake.

Lindsay
About Lindsay

I'm a wife and mom to twin boys, a baby girl and a sweet black lab with a serious sweets addiction! Bring on the sugar!

Scripture I’m Loving

“Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer.” Romans 12:12